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Notifying USCIS of a Change of Address

Notifying USCIS of a Change of Address

 

Nearly every alien holding status in the U.S is required to inform USCIS of a change of address to a new non-temporary residence. Specifically, aliens residing in the U.S. are required to report this change within 10 days of relocating within the U.S. The only individuals who are exempt from this rule include diplomats, official government representatives to an international organization, and certain nonimmigrants who do not possess a visa and who are physically present in the U.S. for fewer than 30 days. 

If you fall within one of the following categories, you are legally obligated to comply with the requirements below:

Visa Issues Continue as Experts Try to Restore System

Visa Issues Continue as Experts Try to Restore System

 

As we reported last week, the Bureau of Consular Affairs continues to face technological issues with its visa systems. The Department of State (DOS) posted a statement yesterday that it endeavors to have the system fully reconnected this week. As of noon yesterday, 22 posts around the world have been reconnected. This represents approximately half of the global nonimmigrant visa volume. 

The agency stated that it has made good progress as it processes the large backlog of cases created by the system shutdown. Some posts were able to handle visa interviews as well as some visa printing by the end of last week. Several posts have also begun rescheduling visa appointments. 

Berardi Immigration Law Names Gabriella Agostinelli Associate Attorney

Berardi Immigration Law Names Gabriella Agostinelli Associate Attorney

 

Berardi Immigration Law is pleased to announce that Gabriella Agostinelli has been promoted to the position of Associate Attorney.

Agostinelli joined Berardi Immigration Law as a Law Clerk in 2014. She received her Juris Doctor from the SUNY Buffalo Law School in 2014 and Bachelor’s Degrees in International Business and International Relations from Canisius College in 2011. 

Client Success Story: Fichman Furniture

Client Success Story: Fichman Furniture

 

Toronto-native Erran Fichman came to Berardi Immigration Law just three years ago wondering how he could expand his furniture business to the United States. Fichman owns Fichman Furniture (www.fichman.com), a company that designs and manufactures custom radiator covers. After successfully running his business for seven years in Canada, the demand for his product grew exponentially. It was time for Fichman Furniture to branch out. 

Worldwide Delays in Passport and Visa Processing

Worldwide Delays in Passport and Visa Processing

 

A systemic technological issue within the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs has globally halted U.S. passport and visa issuance. The issue originates within the Consular Consolidated Database (CCD), a data platform operated by the Bureau to store information on applicants for immigrant visas, non-immigrant visas, and U.S. passports at consular posts abroad. With this current outage, U.S. embassies and consulates worldwide have also delayed most scheduled interviews at this time. The technological issue is not linked to a particular country, immigration document or visa category. 

 

Catholic Charities Receives $100,000 Grant from John R. Oishei Foundation for Healthcare Project

Catholic Charities of Buffalo has received a two-year, $200,000 grant from the John R. Oishei Foundation to assist its Immigration and Refugee Assistance Program (IRAP) in establishing a multidisciplinary health care clinic to serve new arrivals at its campus on Buffalo’s West Side.
        
Funding for the clinic will help support the renovation and repurposing of the former Nativity Roman Catholic Church on Herkimer Street to serve as a “one-stop” service center. Health care partner Mobile Primary will provide refugee health assessments and primary care. Baker Victory Services will provide dental health assessment and services. D’Youville College faculty and allied health students will assist in provision of clinic services. Plans also include the location of a Women, Infants and Children (WIC) site in the facility.
        

How Visitors to the U.S. Can Bring Domestic or Personal Servants

How Visitors to the U.S. Can Bring Domestic or Personal Servants

 

If you are in the process of coming to the United States on a temporary nonimmigrant visa or if you are already in the U.S. on a nonimmigrant visa, you may be able to bring not only your family members, but also your nanny, maid, cook, and other domestic or personal employees. They may qualify for a B-1 visa, primarily intended for business visitors to the United States. It is a more uncommon use of the B-1 visa, evidenced by the fact that these types of visas are specially annotated with the visitor’s position. 

Which types of visa holders can bring employees to the U.S.?